About the Cyberlaw Clinic

Harvard Law School‘s Cyberlaw Clinic, based at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, provides high-quality, pro-bono legal services to appropriate clients on issues relating to the Internet, technology, and intellectual property. Students enhance their preparation for high-tech practice and earn course credit by working on real-world litigation, client counseling, advocacy, and transactional / licensing projects and cases. The Clinic strives to help clients achieve success in their activities online, mindful of (and in response to) existing law. The Clinic also works with clients to shape the law’s development through policy and advocacy efforts. The Cyberlaw Clinic was the first of its kind, and it continues its tradition of innovation in its areas of practice. The Clinic works independently, with law students supervised by experienced and licensed attorneys.  In some cases, the Clinic collaborates with counsel throughout the country to take advantage of regional or substantive legal expertise. The Cyberlaw Clinic advocates with or on behalf of collaborators and clients on a variety of law and policy topics. The Clinic generally does not take positions in its own name. It makes client selection and other decisions relevant to its practice mindful of a set of core values and actively seeks to advance those values through its work. Values at the heart of the Clinic’s practice and teaching activities include: promotion of a robust and inclusive online ecosystem for free expression; advancement of diversity as a key interest in technology development and tech policy; elimination or mitigation of the impact of bias in the development and deployment of technology; respect for and protection of privacy, vis-à-vis both private and government actors; open government; transparency with respect to public and private technical systems that impact all citizens (and, in particular, members of vulnerable populations); access to knowledge and information; advancement of cultural production through efficient and balanced regulatory and enforcement regimes; and support for broad participation in public discourse

From the Blog

Black Lives Matter

Each day, the news brings to light more examples of profound injustice suffered by Black people in the United States and confirms that our nation has never adequately confronted, let alone addressed, systemic racism. Moreover, those few high-profile stories that attract scrutiny only begin to hint at the lived experience of racially marginalized communities in the U.S. 

Looking Back at 2019-20, The Cyberlaw Clinic’s 20th Anniversary Year

When the Cyberlaw Clinic was founded at Harvard Law School during the 1999-2000 academic year, the law was evolving to accommodate rapidly-developing technologies that facilitated communication and interaction with content online. While large commercial entities could afford to pay for high-quality legal services in the emerging area of cyberlaw, the same wasn’t true for many individuals, scholars, non-profits, mission-driven start-ups, and advocacy organizations. 

Featured

Barclays Capital Inc. v. TheFlyontheWall.com

BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. v. THEFLYONTHEWALL.COM  |  No. 10-1372-CV  |  2d Cir. June 21, 2010  |  The Cyberlaw Clinic and the Electronic Frontier Foundation prepared this amicus brief (pdf), and it was submitted to the Second Circuit on behalf of Citizen Media Law Project, Electronic Frontier Foundation, and Public Citizen.  Amici urged the court to apply First Amendment scrutiny to the “hot news misappropriation” doctrine.  The Second Circuit ultimately overturned the district court’s decision on preemption grounds.